Malaria Prevention

Stop the bite, stop malaria. Malaria is common to sub-tropical climates and geographical locations. Many villages have standing and stagnant

World Malaria Day

April 25th annually is a day for all citizens to remember their responsibility to save lives from malaria. The theme

About us

Buy-A-Net brings relief from and protection against leading killer diseases of mothers and their children in Uganda, especially malaria, through...

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Mosquitos

The Problem: Deadly Night Biters Malaria is a killer disease that is spread through the bite of an infected mosquito....

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Where We Are

Uganda 101 Uganda is Buy-A-Net’s first target country. Buy-A-Net chose Uganda because Uganda is recorded as a malaria “high-burden” nation...

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Our Mission

Mission How to hang a bed net demonstration Buy-a-Net Malaria Prevention Group improves the health of vulnerable Ugandans affected by...

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Home

Stop the bite, stop malaria.


Malaria is common to sub-tropical climates and geographical locations. Many villages have standing and stagnant water which attracts mosquitos. The people that live in these small, isolated villages have no outside influences to educate and inform them about malaria and how to prevent it.

The Ugandan government is part of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) initiative which is supported by the World Health Organization. They are working to educate and support their people with various programs but have limited resources to tackle disease, and they need our help. Community workers are a critical part of the model of disease prevention at Buy-a-Net.

The bad news about malaria
Malaria is a disease that is spread through the bite of an infected female anopheles mosquito.

Malaria is a global health crisis. More than 50 percent of the world’s population is at risk, or 3.3 billion people.

Malaria is largely a maternal and child health crisis.

Malaria is a leading killer of children in Africa.

Somewhere in Africa, a mother loses her child to malaria every 45 seconds. That is equal to 2,000 children every day.